Category Archives: Kids Fitness

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Children in the 21st century spend most of their time watching television, playing video games or working on computers. On top of that, they are driven to and from school. Therefore, this means that they have little or no physical exercise or activities. In spite of their busy schooling schedules, it is imperative that they have some specific time to learn about health and fitness. Some diseases can also be avoided by only learning about proper health and taking part in physical fitness. Complications such as.
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Computer games used to be the bane of parents’ lives, their children spending days and nights cloistered in an eerily glowing war zone with only young thumbs moving to save themselves. Not anymore: Interactive gaming is the new family activity, and is now so popular that the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition (PCFSN) has just teamed up with America’s Entertainment Software Association (ESA) to promote interactive games as a way to gain a.
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Obesity and the form of diabetes linked to it are taking an even worse toll on America’s youths than medical experts had realized. As obesity rates in children have climbed, so has the incidence of Type 2 diabetes, and a new study adds another worry: the disease progresses more rapidly in children than in adults and is harder to treat. “It’s frightening how severe this metabolic disease is in children,” said Dr. David M. Nathan, an.
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Video games, long demonized by public health officials and parents for contributing to sedentary habits and obesity among children, scored a big win Monday night with a new partnership between the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition and the video game industry's major trade group, the Entertainment Software Association. The partnership was announced at a splashy reception in the gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum attended by Health.
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One way to halt soaring childhood obesity rates in countries like the US? Cut 64 excess calories a day, on average, from children’s diets, claim US scientists in a new study published on Tuesday. While shaving 64 calories may not seem like a lot, researchers from Columbia University state that doing so can make a big impact in reducing obesity rates by 2020 in the nation. Add in a healthy dose of exercise and the combination of.
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